Melanoma Risk Management & Treatment

Learn about options for melanoma screening, prevention and treatment

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Melanoma Risk

Everyone is at risk for melanoma; the risk increases with age. The following factors also increase risk:

  • increased sun exposure and exposure to tanning beds
  • having many moles or certain types of irregular moles called dysplastic nevi 
  • men have an overall higher risk for melanoma than women, although this varies by age
  • non-Hispanic white people have a higher risk than people of other races or ethnicities
  • fair skin, blond or red hair, blue eyes, and freckles 
  • previous diagnosis of skin cancer
  • presence of an inherited mutation or a personal or family history of melanoma
  • a weakened immune system

Inherited mutations in the genes below have been linked to increased melanoma risk.

Genes Linked to Melanoma Risk
ACD, BAP1 (especially for uveal melanoma), BRCA2, CDKN2A, CDK4, MC1R, MITF, POT1, PTEN, RB1, TERF2IP, TERT, TP53 

There may be other inherited mutations that increase the risk of melanoma. 

Risk Management and Treatment

People at high risk for melanoma have different options for managing cancer risk. National expert guidelines for melanoma risk management are based on your gene mutation and on your level of risk. Click on the button below to learn more about these guidelines. Speak with your healthcare provider to decide on a risk-management plan and schedule that is right for you.

People diagnosed with melanoma may have different treatment options based on genetic testing and biomarker testing results. Click on the button below to learn more about these treatment options. Speak with your healthcare provider to decide on a treatment plan that is right for you.

Last updated February 13, 2024